The sport of Road Bowling (also called Bowl Playing, Road Bowls or the Score) is usually played with a 28 oz. (793.8 grams) solid iron bowl. Other bowl sizes include 16 and 24 ounce bowls. CPEL manufacture these high quality, perfectly round 16, 24 and 28 ounce bowls for all major Championships and your local score – the perfect gift for emigrants and locals alike.

Road Bowling

Two contestants match their individual skills in throwing the bowl (also known as the bullet) with optimum speed, controlled delivery, and measured accuracy along a predetermined course distance of a normal West Cork roadway. The winner is the player to reach the finishing line with the least number of throws or shots.

Course distances vary in accordance with the nature of the contest, but in general a course distance of four kilometers in length is common. A score, or match, between two road bowlers may be watched by anything from several dozen spectators to many thousands, depending upon the importance of the event and the attraction of the particular pairing involved.

In Ireland, many road bowling courses now exist but the sport is more prevalent in counties Armagh and Cork. It is gaining popularity also in the Castlebar area of Co Mayo, Limerick, Waterford and Co. Louth. In more recent times road bowling games have taken place in counties Antrim, Tyrone and Wexford and also in London and in parts of West Virginia in the USA. Road bowling is an old game, played for centuries in Ireland and at one time was popular throughout the country.


Cronin Precision Engineering have been manufacturing 16 ounce, 24 ounce and 28 ounce iron road bowls (or bullets) for many years in West Cork. We have shipped them to many countries including the USA and Europe.

If you want a quote for price and delivery of Cronin Iron Road Bowls to any worldwide destination, please submit the Quotation Form and we will get back to you with the quote as soon as possible. Alternatively, if you would like to ask us a question, please call us at 023-8845498 or submit the general inquiry form.

(Bowling photo courtesy of blog.discoverirelenad.com and video courtesy of www.dochara.com )